A Handpicked Selection Of The Best Short And Easy Long-Distance Walks, UK.

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(Cover photo credit: Jeremy Segrott)

Ticking off long distance hikes is addictive, but often difficult to do as many take a week, or more to walk. For a lot of people, especially in their 30s – 50’s this kind of time isn’t available. Our list of Easy Long-Distance Walks, UK, will certainly wet your tastebuds for some weekend adventures.

Not surprisingly, it can take some hikers years to walk the whole of the South West Coast Path, and after you are done, you could have walked 20 smaller trails.

So why not walk smaller trails over weekends? You get the benefit from traveling to all corners of the UK, AND you get to tick off a high volume of high quality trails.

In this case, where there is quantity, there is also quality! 

But where to start? Here of course, with our 12 smaller trails for weekend trail ticking (note, some trails made need 3-4 days, but you get the idea).

Ok! Lets begin with our list of of the best short and easy Long-Distance Walks, UK.

Three Castles Path (England)

For those who live in the big smoke (London) the Three Castles Path will certainly be of tempting allure. 

This long distance route is only 60 miles, and offers easy walking through peaceful countryside, from Winchester to Windsor. The route is inspired by a 13th century journey of King John between WIndsor Castle and WInchester, via the castle he erected near Odiham. 

You can find out more on the Three Castles Path website.

Ceredigion Coast Path

If the Pembrokeshire coast path has either been a) completed or b) deemed too long for your busy schedule, then the Ceredigion coast path will certainly appeal.

Starting at St Dogmaels, the start or finish of the PCP, the Ceredigion Coast Path travels 60 miles further north along the Wales Coast Path, offering views of Snowdonia in the North and Pembrokeshire in the south. Much like the Pembrokeshire Coast Path expect stunning views, lots of wildlife, and probably more coastline to yourself as you walk. 

You can find out more on the Discover Ceredigion website.

Millers Way

Dropping by the Lakes any time soon?

Fancy ticking off a long distance trail? Look no further than the Miller’s Way. This 51 mile walk stretching between Kendal and Carlisle was created by Carr’s Breadmaker commemorating the businesses 175th anniversary. Ohhhhh that’s why it’s called the Millers Way. Nice.

The route follows the journey made by Quaker Miller, Jonathan Dodgson Carr, who founded Carr’s flour in Carlisle.

You can find out more on the Visit Eden website.

Wanderlust Way

Created by the Grimsby and Cleethorpes Rambling Club, the Wanderlust way is a short 20 mile long route originally named The Bradley 20. However it was renamed to commemorate the founder of the Wanderlust Rambling CLub, Nev COle. 

The route follows a waymarked circular route, in the Lincolnshire Wolds area of outstanding natural beauty.

You can find out more on the Wanderlust Rambling Club website.

Gowar Way

The Gowar Peninsular is a very pretty piece of countryside close to the less pretty town of Swansea in South Wales. The Gower Way runs 35 miles from Rhossili at the SW of the Gower Peninsula through to Penlle’r Castell at the other end. 

Expect varied geology and a range of scenery, despite the lack of distance. For all the beauty of the Wales Coast Path, and none of the busyness of Pembrokeshire (for example).

You can find out more on the Visit Swansea Bay website.

Coleridge Way

The Coleridge Way, inspired by the late Poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge, who was inspired by the somerset countryside and hills of Exmoor.
This 34 mile route from Nether Stowy to Exford takes you through varied and interesting landscape, with view over the coastline looking into Wales.

You can find out more on the Visit Exmoor website.

Viking Coastal Trail

if you believe Valhalla awaits at your end, the Viking Coastal Trail awaits. This is actually a cycle route but by its nature makes for easy walking. Explore 32 miles of coastline and inland Kent exploring Margate, Broadstairs and Ramsgate.

The route draws inspiration from the Romans, saints and saxons who draw their inspiration from the area.

You can find out more on the Explore Kent website.

Diamond Way

You are probably familiar with the Cotswold Way. But have you ever heard of the Diamon Way long distance route?

The Diamond Way starts, and ends in the Cotswold village of Moreton-in-Marsh, and offers a quieter adventure than the Cotswold Way following imaginative routes through Gloucestershire. 

The route is 65 miles in length, so can easily be done over a 4 day trip by most.

You can find out more on the LDWA website.

West Devon Way

Going back to Dartmoor, we have the West Devon Way – a 37 mile walk, which goes from Okehampton to Plymouth. The route is also formulated around the use of public transport!

This waymarked route is easy to follow, with a few harder to navigate moorland sections.

You can find out more on the Visit Dartmoor website.

Romans and Reivers Route

 The 52 mile Romans and Reivers route follows old roman Roads, forests and lanes through the Reivers country. The route is very up and down, providing a bit of challenge, and is in a quiet part of Britain, giving you a feeling that you are in the middle of nowhere for much of the trip. 

You can find out more on the Scotland’s Great Trails website.

Three Lochs Way

If a mixture of craggy mountains, and lochs takes your fancy, then the Three Lochs Way is certainly worth your attention. The route crosses the Highland Boundary Fault, and winds towards the mountains of the Southern Highlands.  Expect a fascinating journey through the beautiful Scottish countryside, over 34 miles.

You can find out more on the Three Lochs Way website.

Cateran Trail

The Cateran Trail is a waymarked 103km long distance trail which travels through Perthshire and the Angus glens. This is an ideal route for a weekend break, not only for its length, but also because its circular meaning you can start, and finish at any point along the route.

The trail can comfortably be walked in five days or less and follows old drove roads, tracks and a mixture of terrain including farmland, moorland and forest plantations. The trail is named after the Caterans – cattle thieves from the middle ages.

You can find out more on the Perth and Kinross Countryside Trust website.

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